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Advaita

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advaita (S): Nondual; not two. Nonduality or monism. The Hindu philosophical doctrine that Ultimate Reality consists of one principle substance, Absolute Being or God. Opposite of dvaita, dualism. Advaita is the primary philosophical stance of the Vedic Upanishads, and of Hinduism, interpreted differently by the many rishis, gurus, panditas and philosophers. See: Vedanta.

Advaita Vedanta is a school of Hindu philosophy and religious practice, giving "a unifying interpretation of the whole body of Upanishads". The principal, though not the first, exponent of the Advaita Vedanta-interpretation was Shankara Bhagavadpada who systematised the works of preceding philosophers.

Due to western Orientalism and Perennialism, and its influence on Indian Neo-Vedanta and Hindu nationalism, Advaita Vedanta is widely considered to be the most influential and most dominant sub-school of the Vedanta school of Hindu philosophy and religious practice. Its teachings have influenced various sects of Hinduism and acquired a broad acceptance in Indian culture and beyond as the paradigmatic example of Hindu spirituality.

The key source texts for all schools of Vedānta are the Prasthanatrayi, the canonical texts consisting of the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita and the Brahma Sutras, of which they give a philosophical interpretation and elucidation.

"Advaita" refers to the identity of the true Self, Atman, which is pure consciousness , and the highest Reality, Brahman, which is also pure consciousness. Followers seek liberation/release by acquiring vidyā (knowledge) of the identity of Atman and Brahman. Attaining this liberation takes a long preparation and training under the guidance of a guru.

[[Wikipedia:Advaita Vedanta developed in a multi-faceted religious and philosophical landscape. The tradition developed in interaction with the other traditions of India, Buddhism, Vaishnavism and Shaivism, as well as the other schools of Vedanta.

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