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Ari Buddhism

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Ari Buddhism (Burmese: အရည်းဂိုဏ်း, IPA: [əjí ɡáiɴ]) is the name given to the religious practice common in Burma, prior to Anawrahta's rise and the subsequent conversion of Bagan (Pagan) to Theravada Buddhism in the eleventh century. It was introduced in the 7th century, possibly through trade contact from India or Tibet. It has largely been categorized as a Tantric form of Buddhism, combining elements of both Buddhism, nat worship, indigenous naga worship and Hinduism. Some scholars claim that it is related to the Buddhist religious practices of the Kingdom of Nanzhao and the subsequent Kingdom of Dali in modern-day Yunnan, China. Other historians like Than Tun contend that the Aris were forest-dwelling monks who simply differed in monastic practice from Theravadin monks, especially with regard to adherence to the Vinaya, the Buddhist monastic code, as they were much less orthodox, allowed to consume alcohol, engage in sexual relations and eat midday.

Source

Wikipedia:Ari Buddhism