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Bhavana

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Bhāvanā (Pali; Sanskrit, also bhāvana) literally means "development" or "cultivating" or "producing" in the sense of "calling into existence."


It is an important concept in Buddhist praxis (Patipatti).

The word bhavana normally appears in conjunction with another word forming a compound phrase such as Citta-bhavana (the development or cultivation of the heart/mind) or Metta-bhavana (the development/cultivation of lovingkindness).


When used on its own bhavana signifies 'spiritual cultivation' generally.


bhavana: Contemplation. Literally means cultivation.

General term for any type of meditational practice involving continuous attention by the mind to any suitable object.

The two main types of meditation practiced in exoteric Buddhism are shamatha (calming) and vipashyana (insight) meditation, while in esoteric Buddhism various forms of visualization are used along with the methods practiced in exoteric Buddhism.


Etymology

Bhavana derives from the word Bhava meaning becoming or the subjective process of arousing mental states.


To explain the cultural context of the historical Buddha's employment of the term, Glenn Wallis emphasizes bhavana's sense of cultivation.

He writes that a farmer performs bhavana when he or she prepares soil and plants a seed. Wallis infers the Buddha's intention with this term by emphasizing the terrain and focus on farming in northern India at the time in the following passage.


"I imagine that when Gotama, the Buddha, chose this word to talk about meditatione had in mind the ubiquitous farms and fields of his native India. Unlike our words 'meditation' or 'contemplation,' Gotama’s term is musty, rich, and verdant.

It smells of the earth.

The commonness of his chosen term suggests naturalness, everydayness, ordinariness.

The term also suggests hope: no matter how fallow it has become, or damaged it may be, a field can always be cultivated — endlessly enhanced, enriched, developed — to produce a favorable and nourishing harvest."


Buddhism

In the Pali Canon bhāvanā is often found in a compound phrase indicating personal, intentional effort over time with respect to the development of that particular faculty.

For instance, in the Pali Canon and post-canonical literature one can find the following compounds:


It means the cultivation (bhavana) of a broad range of skills, covering everything from worldview, to ethics, livelihood and Mindfulness.


In addition, in the Canon, the development (bhāvanā) of Samatha-vipassana is lauded.

Subsequently, Theravada teachers have made use of the following compounds:

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The word bhavana is sometimes translated into English as 'meditation' so that, for example, Metta-bhavana may be translated as 'the meditation on Loving-kindness'.

Meditation as a state of absorbed concentration on the reality of the present moment is properly called Dhyana (Sanskrit; Pali: Jhana) or Samadhi.


In Jainism

In Jain texts, bhāvana refers to "right conception or notion" or "the moral of a fable."

Source

Wikipedia:Bhavana