The 7th International Conference Buddhism & Australia
will be held on 1-3 February, 2018 in Perth, Western Australia.
READ MORE

Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia Illustrations
Some of the Buddhist Illustrations created by Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
FREE for everyone to use

We would also appreciate your feedback on Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia. Please write feedback here
Here you can read media articles about the Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia which have been published all over the world.

Paypal-logo.jpg
Articles by alphabetic order
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 Ā Ī Ñ Ś Ū Ö Ō
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0


Joy

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
(Redirected from Joyful)
Jump to: navigation, search
Please consider making little donation to help us expand the encyclopedia    Donate Paypal-logo.jpg    Enjoy your readings here and have a wonderful day  


Joy.jpg

Joy (pīti) is a feeling of subtle and refined happiness and is similar to it. In Buddhist psychology, joy is seen as the result of virtuous living, a sign of successful meditation and as an indication of growing spiritual maturity. Many different types of joy are identified in Buddhism. Sympathetic joy, for example, is the ability to be able to rejoice in the success and happiness of others. When the sage Bāvari merely heard the word ‘Buddha’ he experienced exaltation (udagga), jubilation (vedajāta) and elation (attamāna, Sn.995). Buddhālambanapīti is the calm joy one can feel while contemplating a statue of the Buddha. In the Visuddhimagga, joy is categorized according to its intensity and the effect it can have on the body; thus there is minor joy (khuddikā pīti), momentary joy (khaṇikā pīti), showering joy (okkantikā pīti), uplifting joy (ubbegā pīti) and pervading joy (pharaṇā pīti, Vis.143).

Some people are cautious of joy, thinking that it might lead to attachment, but Buddhaghosa made the interesting comment on this matter: ‘It is called joy because it is meant to be enjoyed.’ (Vis.143). Joy is an important part of the jhāna's and one of the seven limbs that lead to enlightenment (D.II,79).

Source

www.buddhisma2z.com