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Amitayus

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[[Image:Amitayus red.jpg|thumb|250px|Amitayus, from the private collection of Sogyal Rinpoche)]

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Amitayus (Skt. Amitāyus, Tib. ཚེ་དཔག་མེད་, Tsepakmé; Wyl. tshe dpag med), 'The Buddha of Boundless Life' — a sambhogakaya aspect of Amitabha, particularly associated with longevity.

He is mostly depicted sitting and holding in his hands a vessel containing the nectar of immortality. Amitayus is also one of the three deities of long life.


See Also


External Links

Source

RigpaWiki:Amitayus







Amitayus (tshe dpag med).

Buddha Amitayus (tshe dpag med) Lit. 'Buddha of Boundless Life; the Sambhogakaya aspect of Amitabha. The buddha associated with the 'empowerment of longevity' and longevity practice.

Source

rangjung.com





Amitayus
阿弥陀仏無量寿仏 (Skt; Jpn Amida-butsu or Muryoju-butsu)

The Buddha Infinite Life or the Buddha of Infinite Life. The Sanskrit name of Amida Buddha, the Buddha of the Pure Land of Perfect Bliss in the west.

Source

sgilibrary.org





Amitāyus. (T. Tshe dpag med; C. Wuliangshou fo; J. Muryōju butsu; K. Muryangsu pul 無量壽佛). In Sanskrit, the buddha or bodhisattva of “Limitless Life” or “Infinite Lifespan.”

Although the name originally was synonymous with Amitābha, in the tantric traditions, Amitāyus has developed distinguishing characteristics and is now sometimes considered to be an independent form of Amitābha.

The Japanese Shingon school, for example, uses Muryōju in representations of the Taizōkai (garbhadhātumaṇḍala) and Amida (Amitābha) in the Kongōkai (vajradhātumaṇḍala).

Amitāyus is often central in tantric ceremonies for prolonging life and so has numerous forms and appellations in various groupings, such as one of six and one of nine.

He is shown in bodhisattva guise, with crown and jewels, sitting in Dhyānāsana with both hands in Dhyānamudrā and holding a water pot (kalaśa) full of Amṛta (here the nectar of long life); like Amitābha, he is usually red.

Source

The Princeton Dictionary of Buddhism by Robert E. Buswell Jr. and Donald S. Lopez Jr.

See Also