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An Ambrosia Ocean of Sublime Explanations

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
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Excerpt on Generosity from the Chod Commentary by Pema Lungtog Gyatso, titled An Ambrosia Ocean of Sublime Explanations:

A Clearly Compiled Commentary Based upon the Close Lineage of Chöd

By giving whatever brings happiness to oneself without any expectation, one works day and night for the welfare of others. Just like how a mother cares for her only child, one abides faultlessly with that attitude alone. Thus, through this, the manner of expressing generosity is clearly revealed. As it states,

however many sentient beings exist throughout the three realms, including all classes of guests, to say “forsaking all material things and giving to everyone” reveals the meaning of the white and mixed feasts. In order to generate the attitude to actually express generosity with all material things,

first one must train with this visualization and become familiar. [72] In order to express generosity to all sentient beings, there is no choice but to express this through the many things that harmonize with their wishes. . . . From the perspective of the stages for simultaneously offering to the higher

objects and expressing generosity to the lower, even beginners such as us are then able to perfect great waves of merit. The way of doing this from the uncommon approach is to train in the visualizations that correspond to the four feasts. In these ways, to become familiar with the union of method and

prajñā through practicing relative and genuine bodhichitta is the way to engage in the practice of chöd. . . . This love is free from harm and brings benefit through compassion. By realizing the sacred dharma, there is never complacency or avarice concerning generosity through dharma. Thus through love,

all sentient beings are placed in states of well-being; and the wish to protect them ensures there are no harmful thoughts. By compassionately wishing that others [85] who suffer could be free from that and in order to benefit them, one exerts in the understanding of the tradition of the great vehicle

throughout the day and night without ever becoming complacent. Giving the dharma to all sentient beings free from avarice means to possess the intent and action of benefiting others. Generosity that occurs through compassion works to pacify the rivers of suffering of all sentient beings so they will all

aspire to attain the state of omniscience. Thus, generosity is expressed with no expectation for a response or a result, driven only by compassionate altruism. . . .


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