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Aparagodaniya

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
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Aparagodaniya (Skt.; Tib. Balangchö; Wyl. ba lang spyod; Eng. 'Enjoyer of Cattle') in the West, which is circular and ruby red.

RigpaWiki:Four continents

Aparagodaniya or Aparagoyana is located in the west, and is shaped like a circle with a circumference of about 7,500 yojanas (Sarvastivada tradition). The tree of this continent is a giant Kadamba tree. The human inhabitants of this continent do not live in houses but sleep on the ground. They are about 24 feet (7.3 m) tall and they live for 500 years.


iralu.com

Aparagodaniya
瞿耶尼牛貨洲西牛貨洲 (Skt; Jpn Kuyani, Goke-shu, or Sai-goke-shu)

Also known as Godaniya. One of the four continents surrounding Mount Sumeru, according to the ancient Indian worldview. The Sanskrit apara means west. The Dharma Analysis Treasury indicates that it is a continent located to the west of Mount Sumeru, in the sea between the outermost of the seven concentric gold mountain ranges and the iron mountain range that constitutes the outermost borders of the world. This iron mountain range is known as the Iron Encircling Mountains. The Dharma Analysis Treasury describes Aparagodaniya as circular, 2,500 yojanas in diameter, while the Long Agama Sutra describes it as semicircular.

Aparagodānīya (अपरगोदानीय).—(usually m., rarely nt., Divyāvadāna 214.24 ff.; no godāna, corresp. to Pali °goyāna, occurs; other variant forms, see below, and compare Godānīya), one of the 4 Buddhist continents, see dvīpa. The regular form is °dānīya, while only °yāna occurs in Pali (but also Goyān-īya, without Apara); for occurrences see s.v. dvīpa. Of the passages there listed, the following show variant forms, aside from Godānīya, q.v.: avara-go° Mūla-Sarvāstivāda-Vinaya i.94.4; aparagoḍānī-lipi Lalitavistara 126.5 (v.l. °nīya-lipi; apparently all mss. ḍ!); °dānika Mahāvastu ii.158.18; iii.378.2; aparagodānir (n. sg. m.) Dharmasaṃgraha 120.

Sanskrit, also spelled संस्कृतम् (saṃskṛtam), is an ancient language of India commonly seen as the grandmother of the Indo-European language family. Closely allied with Prakrit and Pali, Sanskrit is more exhaustive in both grammar and terms and has the most extensive collection of literature in the world, greatly surpassing its sister-languages Greek and Latin


Source

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