The 8th International Conference Buddhism & Australia
will be held on 7-9 February, 2019 in Perth, Western Australia.
READ MORE

Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia Illustrations
Some of the Buddhist Illustrations created by Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
FREE for everyone to use

We would also appreciate your feedback on Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia. Please write feedback here
Here you can read media articles about the Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia which have been published all over the world.

Paypal-logo.jpg
Articles by alphabetic order
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
 Ā Ī Ñ Ś Ū Ö Ō
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0


Bandō Sanjūsankasho

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Please consider making little donation to help us expand the encyclopedia    Donate Paypal-logo.jpg    Enjoy your readings here and have a wonderful day  


2707247778 841559249c m.jpg

The Bandō Sanjūsankasho (坂東三十三箇所?) ("The 33 Bandō Temples") is a series of 33 Buddhist temples in Eastern Japan sacred to Goddess Kannon. Bandō is the old name for what is now the Kantō region, used in this case because the temples are all in the Prefectures of Kanagawa, Saitama, Tokyo, Gunma, Ibaraki, Tochigi and Chiba. As is the case with all such circuits, each location has a rank, and pilgrims believe that visiting them all in order is an act of great religious merit.

Started by Minamoto no Yoritomo and his son Sanetomo, the Bandō Sanjūsankasho is just one of 70 different Kannon pilgrimage circuits existing in Japan, each including 33 temples because the Goddess is believed to have 33 different manifestations. Sugimoto-dera in Kamakura is number one, Zushi's Gandenji's is number two, An'yō-in in Kamakura is the number three, the famous Hasedera in Hase number four, and so on. From its beginning at Sugimotodera to its end in Chiba's Nagodera, the circuit is over 1300 km long. Even though women were allowed to pray at individual temples, the circuit was originally reserved to male pilgrims. Now however most of the pilgrims are women. Pilgrims leave behind a slip of paper or a sticker as a proof of their visit, and many of these can be seen plastered on temple walls and pillars.

The 33 temples of the Bandō Sanjūsankasho circuit

Number 1 - Sugimoto-dera, Kanagawa
Number 2 - Ganden-ji, Kanagawa
Number 3 - An'yō-in, Kanagawa
Number 4 - Hase-dera (Kamakura, Kanagawa)
Number 5 - Shōfuku-ji, Kanagawa
Number 6 - Hasedera, Atsugi, Kanagawa
Number 7 - Kōmyō-ji, Kanagawa
Number 8 - Shōkoku-ji, Kanagawa
Number 9 - Jikō-ji, Saitama
Number 10 - Shōbō-ji, Saitama
Number 11 - Anraku-ji, Saitama
Number 12 - Jion-ji, Saitama
Number 13 - Sensō-ji, Tokyo
Number 14 - Gumyō-ji, Kanagawa
Number 15 - Chōkoku-ji, Gunma
Number 16 - Mizusawadera, Gunma
Number 17 - Manganji, Tochigi
Number 18 - Chūzen-ji, Tochigi
Number 19 - Ōya-ji, Tochigi
Number 20 - Saimyo-ji, Tochigi
Number 21 - Nichirin-ji, Ibaraki
Number 22 - Satakedera, Ibaraki
Number 23 - Kanzeon-ji, Ibaraki
Number 24 - Rakuhō-ji, Ibaraki
Number 25 - Ōmi-dō, Ibaraki
Number 26 - Kiyotaki-ji, Ibaraki
Number 27 - Enpuku-ji, Chiba
Number 28 - Ryushō-in, Chiba
Number 29 - Chiba-dera, Chiba
Number 30 - Kōzō-ji, Chiba
Number 31 - Kasamori-ji, Chiba
Number 32 - Kiyomizu-dera, Chiba
Number 33 - Nago-dera, Chiba

Source

Wikipedia:Bandō Sanjūsankasho