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Ganapati

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One form of Ganapati called Rakta Ganapati, image courtesy of Mahasiddha.org

Ganapati (Skt. gaṇapati; Tib. Tsok Dak, Wyl. tshogs bdag) — an aspect of Ganesha, the Hindu elephant-headed god of luck and wealth. Like several of the Hindu pantheon, Ganapati is recognized and respected in the Buddhist tradition as a powerful worldly protector.

External Links

Source

RigpaWiki:Ganapati







Ganapati01.jpg

Ganapati, Maha Rakta (Tibetan: tsog gi dag po, mar chen. English: The Great Red Lord of Hosts). A wealth deity from Hinduism, also known as Ganesh or Ganesha. This form of Ganapati is regarded as an emanation of Avalokiteshvara.

Shri Ganapati with a body red in colour, having an elephant face with sharp white tusks and possessing three eyes, black hair tied in a topknot with a wishing-gem and a red silk ribbon all in a bundle on the crown of the head. With twelve hands, the six right hold an axe, arrow, hook, vajra, sword and spear. The six left hold a pestle, bow, katvanga, skullcup filled with blood, skullcup filled with human flesh and a shield together with a spear and banner. The peaceful right and left hands are signified by the vajra and skullcup filled with blood held to the heart. The remaining hands are displayed in a threatening manner. Wearing various silks as a lower garment and adorned with a variety of jewel ornaments, the left foot is extended in a dancing manner, standing in the middle of the bright rays of red flickering light.

Source

www.thangkar.com