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Difference between revisions of "Hunting"

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Hunting (''migavā'') is the stalking, chasing and killing of wild animals. In prehistoric times and even today amongst some primitive tribes, people have hunted to provide themselves with food or to supplement their diets. In later periods hunting was sometimes seen as a way to train for war. Today nearly all hunting is done for sport, entertainment or as proof of courage. Buddhism has always disapproved of hunting because it involves cruelty and killing and is in most cases unnecessary. The Buddha said that fowlers (''sākuṇika''), deer stalkers (''māgavika'') and fishermen (''macchaghātaka'') might all have an unfavorable rebirth (A.II,207; S.II,256). The early Buddhists also criticized using animals, e.g. dogs, hawks, cheetahs, etc. to hunt other animals (Ja.V,270), and using one animal as a decoy to catch another (Ja.V,375). Buddhist kings rarely indulged in hunting and few palaces or royal residences in Buddhist countries are decorated with hunting scenes, as are those in many other cultures. Several Jātaka stories criticize hunting for sport and try to evoke sympathy for the victimized animals (Ja.I,145-54). See Blood Sports.
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[[Hunting]] (''[[migavā]]'') is the stalking, chasing and killing of wild [[animals]]. In prehistoric times and even today amongst some primitive tribes, [[people]] have hunted to provide themselves with [[food]] or to supplement their diets. In later periods [[hunting]] was sometimes seen as a way to train for [[war]]. Today nearly all [[hunting]] is done for sport, entertainment or as [[proof]] of [[courage]]. [[Buddhism]] has always disapproved of [[hunting]] because it involves [[cruelty]] and killing and is in most cases unnecessary. The [[Buddha]] said that fowlers (''[[sākuṇika]]''), {{Wiki|deer}} stalkers (''māgavika'') and fishermen (''[[macchaghātaka]]'') might all have an unfavorable [[rebirth]] (A.II,207; S.II,256). The early [[Buddhists]] also criticized using [[animals]], e.g. {{Wiki|dogs}}, hawks, cheetahs, etc. to hunt other [[animals]] (Ja.V,270), and using one [[animal]] as a decoy to catch another (Ja.V,375). [[Buddhist]] [[kings]] rarely indulged in [[hunting]] and few {{Wiki|palaces}} or {{Wiki|royal}} residences in [[Buddhist]] countries are decorated with [[hunting]] scenes, as are those in many other cultures. Several [[Jātaka]] stories criticize [[hunting]] for sport and try to evoke [[sympathy]] for the victimized [[animals]] (Ja.I,145-54). See {{Wiki|Blood}} Sports.
 
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[http://www.buddhisma2z.com/content.php?id=183 www.buddhisma2z.com]
 
[http://www.buddhisma2z.com/content.php?id=183 www.buddhisma2z.com]
 
[[Category:Buddhist Terms]]
 
[[Category:Buddhist Terms]]

Latest revision as of 00:56, 19 March 2014

Hunting.jpg

Hunting (migavā) is the stalking, chasing and killing of wild animals. In prehistoric times and even today amongst some primitive tribes, people have hunted to provide themselves with food or to supplement their diets. In later periods hunting was sometimes seen as a way to train for war. Today nearly all hunting is done for sport, entertainment or as proof of courage. Buddhism has always disapproved of hunting because it involves cruelty and killing and is in most cases unnecessary. The Buddha said that fowlers (sākuṇika), deer stalkers (māgavika) and fishermen (macchaghātaka) might all have an unfavorable rebirth (A.II,207; S.II,256). The early Buddhists also criticized using animals, e.g. dogs, hawks, cheetahs, etc. to hunt other animals (Ja.V,270), and using one animal as a decoy to catch another (Ja.V,375). Buddhist kings rarely indulged in hunting and few palaces or royal residences in Buddhist countries are decorated with hunting scenes, as are those in many other cultures. Several Jātaka stories criticize hunting for sport and try to evoke sympathy for the victimized animals (Ja.I,145-54). See Blood Sports.

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