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Asaṃprajanya

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Asaṃprajanya (Sanskrit; Tibetan phonetic: sheshyin minpa) is a Buddhist term that is translated as "inattentiveness", "non-alertness", etc. In the Mahayana tradition, asaṃprajanya is defined the distracted discrimination accompanying a disturbing emotion.

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Asaṃprajanya is identified as:

Definitions

Mipham Rinpoche states:

Non-alertness inattention is the distracted discrimination accompanying a disturbing emotion. It results in a hasty and mindless engagement in the actions of the three doors without alertness, and so forms the support for downfalls to occur.

The Abhidharma-samuccaya states:

What is inattentiveness? It is it discriminating awareness which is simultaneous with and on the same level as the emotions and thereby is made inattentive regarding actions by body, speech, and mind. It has the function of providing a basis for falling from one's level of being.

Alexander Berzin explains:

Being unalert (shes-bzhin ma-yin-pa) is a disturbing, deluded discriminating awareness associated with longing desire (raga), hostility (dvesha), or naivety (moha), that causes us to enter into improper physical, verbal, or mental activity without knowing correctly what is proper or improper. Thus, we do not take steps to correct or prevent our improper behavior.

The significance of this mental factor is noted in the following verse from the Bodhicaryavatara (Chapter V, verse 26):

A person who is learned and has trust
But does not apply himself diligently
Will be sullied by falling from his status
Because the defect of not being watchful has clung to him.

Source

Wikipedia:Asaṃprajanya