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Kondañña

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1. Kondañña.-The second of the twenty-four Buddhas.

    After sixteen asankheyya and one hundred thousand kappas of pāramī,

    he was born in Rammavatī,

    his father being King Sunanda and his mother Sujātā.

    He belonged to the Kondaññagotta and

    his body was twenty-eight cubits in height.

    For ten thousand years he lived as a layman in three palaces - Ruci, Suruci and Subha (Rāma, Surāmā and Subha, according to BuA);

    his chief wife was Rucidevī and his son Vījitasena.

    He left home in a chariot,

    practised austerities for ten months and

    was given a meal of milk-rice by Yasodharā,

    daughter of a merchant in Sunanda, and

    grass for his seat by the ājīvaka Sunanda.

    His bodhi was a Sālakalyāni tree, and

    his first sermon was preached to ten crores of monks in the Devavana near Amaravatī.

    He held three assemblies of his disciples, the first led by Subhadda, the second by Vijitasena and the third by Udena, all of whom had become arahants.

    He died at the age of one hundred thousand at Candārāmā, and

    the thūpa erected over his relics was seven leagues in height.

    His chief disciples were Bhadda and Subhadda among monks,

    and Tissā and Upatissā among nuns,

    his constant attendant being Anuruddha.

    His chief patrons were Sona and Upasona among laymen and Nandā and Sirimā among laywomen.

The Bodhisatta was a king, Vijitāvī of Candavatī. He left his kingdom, joined the Order and was later reborn in the Brahma-world. Bu.iii.; BuA.107ff; J.i.30.

Source

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