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Longchen Nyingthig

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Longchen Nyingthig (Tibetan: ཀློང་ཆེན་སྙིང་ཐིག་, Wylie: klong chen snying thig) is a systematic explanation of Dzogchen within the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism. Like the world famous Bardo Thodol, the Longchen Nyingthig is a seminal example of the terma tradition. The Longchen Nyingthig is generally classified as a Vajrayana or tantric Buddhist esoteric teaching and has an extensive meditational, trance and ritual practice, oral tradition and tantric literature associated with it.

Thondup & Talbott (1996: xiii) state

Longchen Nyingthig (the heart-essence of infinite expanse, or the ultimate truth of the universal openness) is a cycle of mystical teachings that represent the innermost meditation of Dzogpa Chenpo Dzogchen, revealed by the great scholar and adept Jigme Lingpa (1730-1798). Jigme Lingpa discovered them as a "mind terma" (or "mind treasure"), teachings that were discovered from the enlightened nature of the mind.

Nomenclature, orthography and etymology

The Longchen Nyingtig may be translated as 'seminal heart of Longchenpa', a reference to the central figure of Jigme Lingpa's 'pure visions' (Wylie: dag-snang) in which the texts were revealed. 'Nyingthig' (which connotes 'seminal essence' or 'heart focus). It is worthy of note that 'thig' is an etymon of 'thig-le' which is the Tibetan cognate of the Sanskrit 'bindu' the central point of the 'mandala' (Tibetan: Khor lo).

Alternate orthographies: Longchen Nyingtik.

History and background

70d-250wi.jpg

Atiyoga is traditionally conveyed as a triunic teaching, that is, it has three indivisible sections. The tradition holds Mañjushrīmītra to have first codified Atiyoga into these three indivisible sections, namely: Semde (mind class/cycle); Longde (space class/cycle); and Mengagde (direct/oral instruction class/cycle). One of the principal polysemic symbols of Dzogpa Chenpo or Atiyoga is the Gankyil which is clearly a visual example of a triune and sometimes also a quadrune or a svastika (the sauvastika is also the principal symbol of the Bönpo which shares in the Dzogchen tradition along with the Nyingmapa and Kagyupa). In turn, Shri Singha divided the Mengagde into a further four cycles: the

outer,
inner,
esoteric, and
innermost esoteric cycle.

These four cycles of the Mengagde are of one kind in that they are teachings on the 'primordially pure nature' (or Kadag; Wylie: Ka Dag) which is called 'cutting through' (or Trekchö; Wylie: Khregs Ch'od) all the grasping, clinging and apprehending obscuring the primordially pure substrate of the mindstream: refer Kadag Trekchö. The 'innermost esoteric cycle' of the Mengagde is focused upon the 'spontaneous perfection of appearances' (Lhündrub; Wylie: Lhun Grub) which is known as the 'direct approach' (Tögal; Wylie: Thod rGal): refer Lhündrub Tögal. There are many Mengagde traditions and teachings although there are two principal historical redactions and elucidations given the nomenclature 'Nyingthig'. These principal two are the Vima Nyingthig brought to Tibet by Vimalamitra and the Khandro Nyingthig brought to Tibet by Padmasambhava. Into the mindstream of Jigme Lingpa merged the mindstream tributaries of Vimalamitra and King Trisong Detsen of whom he, Jigme Lingpa, was a joint 'emanation' (Tibetan: tulku) or 'embodiment' (Sanskrit: nirmanakaya). Now as was previously stated Vimalamitra brought the Vima Nyingthig to Tibet. Padmasambhava, who brought the Khandro Nyingthig to Tibet, transmitted this to King Trisong Detsen. So both the Khandro Nyingthig and the Vima Nyingthig were within the mindstream of Jigme Lingpa and were realised by him as 'mind ter' or 'mind terma' (Wylie: dgongs-gter). As Thondup & Talbott state (1996: p. 44):

Jigme Lingpa was a reincarnation of both Vimalamitra himself and King Trisong Detsen, who was a recipient of Nyingthig teachings from Guru Rinpoche Padmasambhava and Vimalamitra. So the Nyingthig teachings of two major lineages flowed together in Jigme Lingpa. Longchen Nyingthig is the essence or embodiment of the two Nyingthig traditions, Vima Nyingthig and Khandro Nyingthig.

Revelation of the Longchen Nyingtig

While transmitting esoteric teachings to his realized disciples in Tibet, Guru Padmasambhava concealed many teachings with the blessings of his enlightened mind stream in the nature of the intrinsic awareness of the minds of his disciples through the power of “mind-mandated transmission” (gtad rgya); thereby the master and disciple became united as one in the teachings and realization. Here, the master has concealed the teachings and blessings, the esoteric attainments, as ter in the pure nature of the minds of his disciples through his enlightened power, and he has made aspirations that the ter may be discovered for the sake of beings when the appropriate time comes.

Thondup and Talbott (1996: p. 122) state that when Jigme Lingpa was 28 years old:

In the evening of the twenty-fifth day of the tenth month of the Fire Ox year of the thirteenth Rabjung cycle (1757), he went to bed with an unbearable devotion to Guru Rinpoche in his heart; a stream of tears of sadness continuously wet his face because he was not in Guru Rinpoche’s presence, and unceasing words of prayers kept singing in his breath. He remained in the depths of that meditation experience of clear luminosity ('Od gSal Gyi sNang Ba) for a long time. While being absorbed in that luminous clarity, he experienced flying a long distance through the sky while riding a white lion. He finally reached a circular path, which he thought to be the circumambulation path of Charung Khashor, now known as Bodhnath Stūpa, and important Buddhist monument of giant structure in Nepal.

Lineage

A Nyingma cycle of teachings and practice, which was discovered by Jikmé Lingpa as mind terma.

The Revelation of Longchen Nyingtik

Regarding the revelation of the Longchen Nyingtik teachings, Tulku Thondup writes:

While Guru Rinpoche was visiting Tibet…he conferred the Longchen Nyingtik teachings on King Trisong Detsen, Khandro Yeshe Tsogyal, and Vairochana… He gave prophetic empowerments by saying that the teachings would be discovered by Jikmé Lingpa, an incarnation (tulku) of King Trisong Detsen. So centuries later, when the prophetic empowerments of Guru Rinpoche ripened and the favorable circumstances came to fruition, the concealed Longchen Nyingtik teachings were accordingly awakened in the enlightened mind of Jikmé Lingpa as mind ter.

Jikmé Lingpa discovered the Longchen Nyingtik teachings as mind ter at the age of twenty-eight. Tulku Thondup writes:

In the evening of the twenty-fifth day of the tenth month of the Fire Ox year of the thirteenth Rabjung cycle (1757), Jikmé Lingpa went to bed with an unbearable devotion to Guru Rinpoche in his heart; a stream of tears of sadness continuously wet his face because he was not in Guru Rinpoche’s presence, and unceasing words of prayers kept singing in his breath.

He remained in the depths of that meditation experience of clear luminosity for a long time. While being absorbed in that luminous clarity, he experienced flying a long distance through the sky while riding a white lion. He finally reached a circular path, which he thought to be the circumambulation path of Jarung Khashor, now known as Boudhanath Stupa, an important Buddhist monument of giant structure in Nepal.

In this vision, the wisdom dakinis gave Jikmé Lingpa a casket containing five yellow scrolls and seven crystal beads. One of the scrolls contained the prophetic guide of Longchen Nyingtik, called Nechang Thukkyi Drombu. At the instruction of a dakini, he ate the yellow scrolls and crystal beads, and all the words and meaning of the Longchen Nyingtik terma were awakened in his mind.

Jikmé Lingpa kept this terma secret for years, and he did not even transcribe the terma until he entered another retreat in which he had a series of visions of Longchen Rabjam. Tulku Thondup explains:

In the earth-hare year (1759) he started another three-year retreat, at Chimpu near Samye monastery. During that retreat, because he was inspired by three successive pure visions of Longchen Rabjam, and he was urged by repeated requests of dakinis, he transcribed his terma as the cycle of Longchen Nyingtik. On the tenth day of the sixth month (monkey month) of the monkey year (1764) he made his terma public for the first time by conferring the transmission of empowerment and the instructions upon fifteen disciples.

The Longchen Nyingtik terma consists of tantric sadhanas and teachings.

Longchen Rabjam (1308-1364), also known as Longchenpa, was one of the greatest Dzogchen masters in the Nyingma tradition, and amongst the most brilliant and original writers in Tibetan Buddhist literature. He brought together into a cohesive system the teachings of Vima Nyingtik and Khandro Nyingtik, on which he wrote the ‘Three Yangtik’ or Inner Essencess.

Four centuries later, Jikmé Lingpa was tremendously inspired by the teachings of Longchenpa. After Jikmé Lingpa discovered the terma of Longchen Nyingtik (which included tantric sadhanas and teachings) he entered into a three-year retreat in the caves of Chimphu in which he fervently invoked Longchenpa with a Guru Yoga he had composed. Longchenpa appeared to him in three visions, through which he received the blessing and transmission of the wisdom body, speech and mind of Longchenpa, empowering him with the responsibility of preserving the meaning of the teachings of Longchenpa, and of spreading them. As a result, Jikmé Lingpa’s mind became one with the wisdom mind of Longchenpa.

In this way, Jikmé Lingpa became the lineage holder of Longchenpa’s teachings on the Vima Nyingtik and Khandro Nyingtik. Jikmé Lingpa was a reincarnation of both King Trisong Detsen and Vimilamitra. Therefore, the Nyingtik teachings of these two major lineages flowed together in Jikmé Lingpa. The Longchen Nyingtik lineage includes both the terma of Longchen Nyingtik discovered by Jikmé Lingpa, and teachings of Longchen Rabjam on Vima Nyingtik and Khandro Nyingtik that were revealed to Jikmé Lingpa in a series of visions.

The Major Texts


The major texts of Longchen Nyingtik are as follows:

Original Tantras 1. The root tantra: Kuntu Zangpo Yeshe Longki Gyü 2. The subsequent tantra: Gyü Chima 3. Teachings: Kuntu Zangpö Gong-nyam 4. Instructions a. Instructions: Nesum Shenje and Neluk Dorje Tsigang b. Their commentaries: Yeshe Lama with its supporting texts

Sadhanas

1. Male vidyadharas a. Peaceful: outer: Guru Yoga inner: Rigdzin Düpa secret: Dukngal Rangdrol innermost secret: Ladrup Tiklé Gyachen

b. Wrathful:

blue: Palchen Düpa red: Takhyung Barwa 2. Female vidyadharas a. Peaceful: root sadhana: Yumka Dechen Gyalmo b. Wrathful: secret sadhana: Senge Dongchen

The Detailed Longchen Nyingtik Lineage

Some of the main lineage holders of the Longchen Nyingtik lineage are listed below.

First stage


Tradition holds that the first human master of the Longchen Nyingthig lineage was Prahevajra.

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The teaching was originally discovered as a terma, a revealed teaching given to the 18th century Nyingma teacher Kunkhyen Jigme Lingpa. The teaching is allegedly descended from the Dharmakaya Buddha Kuntu Zangpo (Skt. Samantabhadra), passed to the Samboghakaya Buddha Dorje Sempa (Skt. Vajrasattva), and then through a series of other teachers until it reached Guru Padmasambhava, who arrived in the mid-8th century to Tibet and converted much of the populace to Buddhism.

Teaching

Sam van Schaik (2000) opens discourse into English on the themes and motifs of the simultaneous and gradualist approaches to the Great Perfection within the Longchen Nyingthig.

Source

Wikipedia:Longchen Nyingthig







Longchen Nyingtik (Tib. ཀློང་ཆེན་སྙིང་ཐིག་, Wyl. klong chen snying thig) — a Nyingma cycle of teachings and practice, which was discovered by Jikmé Lingpa as mind terma.

The Revelation of Longchen Nyingtik

Regarding the revelation of the Longchen Nyingtik teachings, Tulku Thondup writes:

While Guru Rinpoche was visiting Tibet…he conferred the Longchen Nyingtik teachings on King Trisong Detsen, Khandro Yeshe Tsogyal, and Vairochana… He gave prophetic empowerments by saying that the teachings would be discovered by Jikmé Lingpa, an incarnation (tulku) of King Trisong Detsen.
So centuries later, when the prophetic empowerments of Guru Rinpoche ripened and the favorable circumstances came to fruition, the concealed Longchen Nyingtik teachings were accordingly awakened in the enlightened mind of Jikmé Lingpa as mind ter.

Jikmé Lingpa discovered the Longchen Nyingtik teachings as mind ter at the age of twenty-eight. Tulku Thondup writes:

In the evening of the twenty-fifth day of the tenth month of the Fire Ox year of the thirteenth Rabjung cycle (1757), Jikmé Lingpa went to bed with an unbearable devotion to Guru Rinpoche in his heart; a stream of tears of sadness continuously wet his face because he was not in Guru Rinpoche’s presence, and unceasing words of prayers kept singing in his breath.
He remained in the depths of that meditation experience of clear luminosity for a long time. While being absorbed in that luminous clarity, he experienced flying a long distance through the sky while riding a white lion. He finally reached a circular path, which he thought to be the circumambulation path of Jarung Khashor, now known as Boudhanath Stupa, an important Buddhist monument of giant structure in Nepal.

In this vision, the wisdom dakinis gave Jikmé Lingpa a casket containing five yellow scrolls and seven crystal beads. One of the scrolls contained the prophetic guide of Longchen Nyingtik, called Nechang Thukkyi Drombu At the instruction of a dakini, he ate the yellow scrolls and crystal beads, and all the words and meaning of the Longchen Nyingtik terma were awakened in his mind.

Jikmé Lingpa kept this terma secret for years, and he did not even transcribe the terma until he entered another retreat in which he had a series of visions of Longchen Rabjam. Tulku Thondup explains:

In the earth-hare year (1759) he started another three-year retreat, at Chimpu near Samye monastery. During that retreat, because he was inspired by three successive pure visions of Longchen Rabjam, and he was urged by repeated requests of dakinis, he transcribed his terma as the cycle of Longchen Nyingtik. On the tenth day of the sixth month (monkey month) of the monkey year (1764) he made his terma public for the first time by conferring the transmission of empowerment and the instructions upon fifteen disciples.

The Longchen Nyingtik terma consists of tantric sadhanas and teachings.

The Nyingtik Teachings

The Nyingtik teachings are the innermost secret teachings of Dzogchen. The Dzogchen teachings were revealed to Prahevajra (Tib. Garab Dorje) by Vajrasattva, and passed down through an unbroken lineage to present day masters. Within the Dzogchen teachings, there are three categories of teachings suitable to students of different capacity. The Nyingtik is the innermost secret cycle of teachings of the Category of Pith Instructions; this cycle is the most direct approach for students of the highest capacity.

Within the Nyingtik teachings, there are tantras and instructional texts. Regarding the instructional texts, Tulku Thondup explains:

The instructional teachings are elucidated and condensed in two major traditions of Nyingtik.

The first one is the detailed teachings for/of the scholars, brought to Tibet by Vimalamitra and known as Vima Nyingtik. It is mainly based on the Seventeen Tantras and the Troma tantra. The second one is the profound teachings for/of mendicants or yogis), brought to Tibet by Guru Padmasambhava and known as Khandro Nyingtik. It is mainly based on the Longsal Barma tantra.

In the fourteenth century in Tibet, the great master Longchen Rabjam became the lineage holder of both of these Nyingtik traditions, and wrote a commentary on each tradition.

Longchen Rabjam, Jikmé Lingpa, and the Longchen Nyingtik Lineage

Longchen Rabjam (1308-1364), also known as Longchenpa, was one of the greatest Dzogchen masters in the Nyingma tradition, and amongst the most brilliant and original writers in Tibetan Buddhist literature. He brought together into a cohesive system the teachings of Vima Nyingtik and Khandro Nyingtik, on which he wrote the ‘Three Yangtik’ or Inner Essencess.

Four centuries later, Jikmé Lingpa was tremendously inspired by the teachings of Longchenpa. After Jikmé Lingpa discovered the terma of Longchen Nyingtik (which included tantric sadhanas and teachings) he entered into a three-year retreat in the caves of Chimphu in which he fervently invoked Longchenpa with a Guru Yoga he had composed. Longchenpa appeared to him in three visions, through which he received the blessing and transmission of the wisdom body, speech and mind of Longchenpa, empowering him with the responsibility of preserving the meaning of the teachings of Longchenpa, and of spreading them. As a result, Jikmé Lingpa’s mind became one with the wisdom mind of Longchenpa.

In this way, Jikmé Lingpa became the lineage holder of Longchenpa’s teachings on the Vima Nyingtik and Khandro Nyingtik. Jikmé Lingpa was a reincarnation of both King Trisong Detsen and Vimalamitra. Therefore, the Nyingtik teachings of these two major lineages flowed together in Jikmé Lingpa.

The Longchen Nyingtik lineage includes both the terma of Longchen Nyingtik discovered by Jikmé Lingpa, and teachings of Longchen Rabjam on Vima Nyingtik and [[Khandro [Nyingtik]] that were revealed to Jikmé Lingpa in a series of visions.

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The Stages of Practice

Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche said:

The cycle of the Longchen Nyingtik is composed of many sections. It includes the preliminary and main practices, the development and completion stages, and, most important, the practice of Ati Yoga, or Dzogchen. It thus constitutes a complete path to enlightenment.

In the Longchen Nyingtik tradition, the preliminary (or ngöndro) practices are commonly referred to as the Longchen Nyingtik Ngöndro.

After completing the ngondro, training in the development and completion stages is done through sadhana practices such as Rigdzin Dupa. Traditionally, a student trains in a series of three sadhanas known as the Three Roots.

Finally, if the student is sufficiently prepared, a qualified teacher may give the students instructions in Dzogchen, which focus on the direct realization of the nature of mind.

The Major Texts

The major texts of Longchen Nyingtik are as follows:

Original Tantras

  1. The root tantra: Kuntu Zangpo Yeshe Longki Gyü
  2. The subsequent tantra: Gyü Chima
  3. Teachings: Kuntu Zangpö Gong-nyam
  4. Instructions
a. Instructions: Nesum Shenje and Neluk Dorje Tsigang
b. Their commentaries: Yeshe Lama with its supporting texts

Sadhanas

1. Male vidyadharas

a. Peaceful:
outer: Guru Yoga
inner: Rigdzin Düpa
secret: Dukngal Rangdrol
innermost secret: Ladrup Tiklé Gyachen
b. Wrathful:
blue: Palchen Düpa
red: Takhyung Barwa

2. Female vidyadharas

a. Peaceful: root sadhana: Yumka Dechen Gyalmo
b. Wrathful: secret sadhana: Senge Dongchen

The Detailed Longchen Nyingtik Lineage

Some of the main lineage holders of the Longchen Nyingtik lineage are listed below.

First stage

Hitting the Essence in Three Words
Six Experiences of Meditation
Seven Nails
Four Means of Abiding
Vima Nyingtik
Khandro Nyingtik

Later stages

A Brief Guide to the Stages of Visualization
The Words of My Perfect Teacher
The Mirror for Seeing Clearly
Special Teaching of the Wise and Glorious King
Illuminating the Excellent Path to Omniscience
Ngöndro Compendium
A Guide to the Words of My Perfect Teacher
A Torch for the Path to Omniscience
The Words of the Vidyadhara which Bestow the Majesty of Great Bliss

Present day teachers
There are many present-day masters of the Longchen Nyingtik lineage; the list below includes some of the teachers most familiar to Rigpa students.

Footnotes

Further Reading

  • Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche, The Wish-Fulfilling Jewel: The Practice of Guru Yoga According to the Longchen Nyingtik Tradition, Shambhala Publications
  • Patrul Rinpoche, The Words of My Perfect Teacher, translated by the Padmakara Translation Group, Shambhala 1994, revised ed. 1998
  • Sam van Schaik, Approaching the Great Perfection: Simultaneous and Gradual Methods of Dzogchen Practice in the Longchen Nyingtig, Boston: Wisdom Publications, 2003
  • Steven D. Goodman, 'Rig-'dzin Jigs-med gling-pa and the kLong-Chen sNying-Thig' in Tibetan Buddhism: Reason and Revelation edited by Steven D Goodman and Ronald M. Davidson, SUNY, 1992
  • Tulku Thondup, Enlightened Journey, Boston & London, Shambhala, 1995
  • Tulku Thondup, Masters of Meditation and Miracles, Shambhala, 1996

External Links

Source

RigpaWiki:Longchen Nyingthig







ཀློང་ཆེན་སྙིང་ཐིག klong chen snying thig
Heart Essence of the Vast Expanse


Brief History

Longchen Nyingthig Tshogshing

The Longchen Nyingthig is a Terma cycle revealed by the master Rigdzin Jigme Lingpa. Since its inception in the late 18th century, it has become one of the most widespread sets of teachings in the Nyingma tradition. It is particularly known and loved for its extensive commentarial literature, which includes practice manuals such as the famed Yeshe Lama.

These teachings were originally transmitted by the master Padmasambhava to King Trisong Deutsen, the Dakini Yeshe Tsogyal and the Lotsawa Vairochana at Samye Monastery in central Tibet. As the time for these teachings to spread was not yet right, they were then written in symbolic script by [[Yeshe Tsogyal], entrusted to the Dakinis, and hidden to be revealed at a later time. The king later reincarnated as the Treasure Revealer Jigme Lingpa, who recalled the teachings he had received and, recognizing the time was ripe for them to be practised, put them down in writing and began to teach.

Jigme Lingpa, the Terton who revealed this cycle of teachings, was a reincarnation of two important masters, Vimalamitra and King Trisong Deutsen. As the embodiment of these two figures, Tibet's two primary Dzogchen lineages were combined in Jigme Lingpa -- the Vima Nyingthig and Khandro Nyingthig, both of which are contained in the Nyingthig Yabshi. Hence, the Longchen Nyingthig terma cycle is considered a condensation of these profound teachings.

The texts that were revealed by Jigme Lingpa, in their present-day form, comprise three volumes, known as the Nyingthig Tsapod (snying thig rtsa pod). The numerous treatises, sadhanas and prayers it contains deal primarily with tantric practice, in particular the stages of Development Stage and Dzogchen.

Lineage

The primary lineage is as follows

The Four Main Lineage Holders

From Jigme Lingpa's heart son Jigme Trinle Ozer to the present Dodrupchen Rinpoche

From Jigme Lingpa's heart son Jigme Gyalwe Nyugu to the present Chatral Rinpoche

From Jigme Lingpa's heart son Jigme Gyalwe Nyugu to the present Penor Rinpoche

Other Lineage Masters

Primary Sadhanas

Guru

The Longchen Nyingthig cycle relates primarily to the teachings of Dzogchen, particularly the Innermost Essence teachings. Though there are various practices and Sadhanas found in this tradition, such practices are often approached from this Dzogchen perspective. These practices include:



[[File:Longchen Nyingthig- Tsa Sum-2.jpg|240px|thumb|right|Takyung Barwa)]


Dechen Gyalmo



Primary Texts

The main Tantras and Pith-instructions

Preliminary Practice Instructions

Development Stage Instructions

Completion Stage Instructions

Prayers and Aspirations

Present Day Teachers of the Longchen Nyingthig

Longchen Nyingthig Literature in Translation

  • Works on the Longchen Nyingthig Ngondro:
    • Patrul Rinpoche (1994). Words of My Perfect Teacher. Translated by the Padmakara Translation Group. San Francisco: HarperCollins. ISBN 978-1570624124
    • Ngawang Pelzang, Khenpo (2004). A Guide to the Words of My Perfect Teacher. Translated by the Padmakara Translation Group. Boston: Shambhala Publications. ISBN 978-1590300732
    • An Elucidation of The Path To Excellent Omniscience. Translated by the Vajravairochana Translation Committee. Halifax: Vajravairochana Translation Committee, 1996.
    • Thondup, Tulku (1982). Dzogchen: Innermost Essence Preliminary Practice. India: Library of Tibetan Works and Archives.
  • Works on Dzogchen:
    • Yeshe Lama. Translated by Sangye Khandro.
    • Van Schaik, Sam (2004). Approaching the Great Perfection. Boston: Wisdom Publications.
  • Sadhana Practices:
    • The Queen of Great Bliss of Long-Chen Nying-Thig. Translated by Tulku Thondup. Sikkim: Published by Dodrup Chen Rinpoche, 1992. A translation of the Yumkha Dechen Gyalmo sadhana.
    • The Assemblage of Vidyadharas of Long-Chen Nying-Thig. Translated by Tulku Thondup. Sikkim: Published by Dodrup Chen Rinpoche, 1992. A translation of the Rigdzin Dupa sadhana.

Other References

  • Thondup, Tulku (1996) Masters of Meditation and Miracles. Boston: Shambhala Publications. - The most complete reference on the lineages and practices of the Longchen Nyingthig in the English language.
  • Gyatso, Janet (1998). Apparitions of the Self. Princeton: Princeton University Press. - Contains translations of two biographies of Jigme Lingpa.
  • The Dzogchen Lineage of Nyoshul Khenpo

Alternate Names and Spellings

See Also

Wylie text from the Longchen Nyingtik

External Links

Source

RangjungYesheWiki:Longchen Nyingthig