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Prthvi

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Prithvi is one of several Sanskrit names for the Earth Mother, more commonly known as Mother Bhumi Devi.

Prithvi is the personification of the Earth, and is therefore also known as Prithivi Tattwa, the essence of the element earth.

Prithvi is also called Dhra, Dharti, or Dhrithri, meaning 'that which holds everything'.

As Prithvi Devi, she is one of two wives of Lord Vishnu,

His other wife being Lakshmi Devi (Sridevi).

In fact, Prithvi is another form of Laxmi.

As Prithvi Mata, "Mother Earth", she contrasts with Dyaus Pita, who is "Father Sky".

In the Rigveda, Earth and Sky are frequently addressed in the dual, which may indicate the idea of two complementary half-shells.

Prithvi is the wife of Dyaus Pita ('Father Dyaus'), and the widespread belief that these two were originally a single deity appears to be mistaken.

(See Dyavaprthivi). Prithvi is known to be the mother of Indra and Agni.

When Lord Indra killed Dyaus Pita, she applauded and married him.

Prithvi, or Mother Bhumi, is associated with the cow.

Prithu, an incarnation of Vishnu, milked her in the cow's form to get food from her.

Prithvi also appears in Early Buddhism,

where she is mentioned in the Pali Canon, dispelling the temptation figure Mara by attesting to Gautama Buddha's worthiness to attain enlightenment.

In art, she is typically represented as a woman with four arms and a green complexion.

Source

www.harekrsna.com