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Saṅghavarman

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
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Saṅghavarman (康僧鎧, 3rd century) was supposedly an Indian. His Sanskrit name was translated into Chinese as Saṅgha armor, and he was given the surname Kang in Chinese, which may imply his ethnic origin from Kangju (康居) nomads in central Asia.

He went to Luoyang (洛陽), in 252, the fourth year of the Jiaping (嘉平) years of the Cao Wei Kingdom (220–65).

He stayed at the White Horse Temple and translated, from Sanskrit into Chinese, the Sūtra of Amitāyus Buddha (T12n0360) and the Sūtra of the Elder Ugra.

The latter is included in the Great Treasure Pile Sūtra (T11n0310) as its 19th Sūtra, in fascicle 82. Scholars question the Consistency in style between these two translations.

Still, he has been recognized as the translator of the Sūtra of Amitāyus Buddha.

He is not to be confused with two other Saṅghavarmans.

The same Sanskrit name was translated into Chinese as Sengqie-bamo (僧伽跋摩) for one from India, who went to China in 433, and as Sengqie-poluo (僧伽婆羅) for the other from Funan, who lived from 460 to 524 and is also known as Saṅghapāla.

Source

www.sutrasmantras.info