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The Shambhala teachings and Shambhala vision

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
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the Shambhala teachings and Shambhala vision: "The Shambhala teachings are founded on the premise that there is basic human wisdom that can help to solve the world's problems. This wisdom does not belong to any one culture or religion, now does it come only from the West or East. Rather, it is a tradition of human warriorship that has existed in many cultures at many times throughout history."

"According to the legends, [there] was a place of peace and prosperity, governed by wise and compassionate rulers. The citizens of were equally kind and learned, so that, in general, the kingdom was a model society. This place was called Shambhala." "The basic message of the Shambhala teachings is that the best of human life can be realized under ordinary circumstances. That is the basic wisdom of Shambhala: that in this world, as it is, we can find a good and meaningful human life that will also serve others." "According to the Shambhala Teachings

"Shambhala vision teaches that, in the face of the world's great problems, we can be heroic and kind at the same time. Shambhala vision is the opposite of selfishness. When we are afraid of ourselves and afraid of the seeming threat the world presents, then we become extremely selfish. We want to build...our own little cocoons."

"The Shambhala teachings are not based on converting the world to another theory. the premise of Shambhala vision is that, in order to establish an enlightened society for others, we need to discover what inherently we have to offer the world. So, to begin with, we should make an effort to examine our own experience, in order to see what it contains that is of value in helping ourselves and others to uplift their experience."

"This book, ('[[Shambhala:[The Sacred Path of the Warrior]]') is a manual for people who have lost the principles of sacredness, , and warriorship in their lives. It is based particularly on the principles of warriorship as that were embodied in the ancient civilizations of India, Tibet, China, Japan, and Korea. The extraordinarily "ordinary" way this is proposed make these principles accessible to anyone. This book shows how to refine one's way of life and how to propagate the true meaning of warriorship. It is inspired by the example of the Great Tibetan King, 'Gesar of Ling' - his inscrutability and fearlessness and the way in which he conquered barbarianism by using the principles of Tiger, Lion, Garuda, Dragon, (Tak, Seng, Khyung, Druk)." (see: Four Dignities and 'Shambhala , Sacred Path of the Warrior'

Source

www.glossary.shambhala.org