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The Gospel of Buddha:Chapter 57: The Sermon on Abuse

From Chinese Buddhist Encyclopedia
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And the Blessed One observed the ways of society
and noticed how much misery came from malignity and foolish offences
done only to gratify vanity and self-seeking pride. [1]

And the Buddha said:
"If a man foolishly does me wrong,
I will return to him the protection of my ungrudging love;
the more evil comes from him, the more good shall go from me;
the fragrance of goodness always comes to me,
and the harmful air of evil goes to him." [2]

A foolish man learning that the Buddha observed the principle of great love
which commends the return of good for evil, came and abused him.
The Buddha was silent, pitying his folly. [3]

When the man had finished his abuse,
the Buddha asked him, saying:
"Son, if a man declined to accept a present made to him,
to whom would it belong?"
And he answered:
"In that case it would belong
to the man who offered it." [4]

"My son," said the Buddha,
"thou hast railed at me,
but I decline to accept thy abuse,
and request thee to keep it thyself.
Will it not be a source of misery to thee?
As the echo belongs to the sound,
and the shadow to the substance,
so misery will overtake the evil-doer without fail." [5]

The abuser made no reply, and Buddha continued: [6]

"A wicked man who reproaches a virtuous one
is like one who loods up and spits at heaven;
the spittle soils not the heaven,
but comes back and defiles his own person. [7]

"The slanderer is like one
who flings dust at another when the wind is contrary;
the dust does not but return on him who threw it.
The virtuous man cannot be hurt
and the misery that the other would inflict
comes back on himself." [8]

The abuser went away ashamed, but he came again
and took refuge in the Buddha, the Dharma, and the Sangha. [9]

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